Author: realestk_jent7t

Now, its skies are mostly blue — a sign the Chinese capital is entering a new era of clean air, the country’s Minister of Ecology and Environment claimed last Wednesday.”The ‘Beijing blue’ has gradually become our new normal,” said Huang Runqiu, the minister, according to state-run tabloid Global Times, as the city recorded its best monthly air quality since records began in 2013.Though Chinese cities have long topped global rankings of the world’s worst air quality, they have shown steady improvement over the years. Beijing only recorded 10 days of heavy air pollution last year, Huang said — a drop…

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Venue: Tokyo, Japan Dates: 24 August-5 September Time in Tokyo: BST +8Coverage: Follow on Radio 5 Live and on the BBC Sport websiteDouble Paralympic gold medallist Kadeena Cox says that repeating her Rio heroics in Tokyo will be tough.Cox won gold in cycling and athletics at the 2016 Games and carried the GB flag at the closing ceremony.The pandemic, injuries and her multiple sclerosis have challenged Cox before the Games, which start on Tuesday. “I am in a great place with my cycling. With athletics, I haven’t had as much running as I would have liked,” she told BBC Sport.”But…

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SharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingHere are five things you need to know about the coronavirus pandemic this Monday morning. We’ll have another update for you this evening.1. Covid travel test cost clamp downIn a move to crack down on “cowboy behaviour”, Health Secretary Sajid Javid says more than 80 private Covid travel test companies on the government’s website will be issued with two-strike warnings, while other non-relevant or redundant ones will be removed. The government’s taking action over misleading prices after a recent review found those displayed were lower than the actual cost. Testing was brought in as a condition of international travel…

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Britain’s Andy Murray defeated American lucky loser Noah Rubin in the Winston-Salem Open first round after scheduled opponent Nick Kyrgios withdrew.Former world number one Murray, 34, beat Rubin 6-2 6-0 and clinched victory by winning 10 successive games.The three-time Grand Slam champion was due to face Australia’s Kyrgios, who pulled out because of a knee injury.Murray, who is set to compete at the US Open from 30 August, will face American Frances Tiafoe next in North Carolina.”I didn’t know if I was going to play tonight. They said if I was playing against a qualifier then I wouldn’t play and…

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Venue: Tokyo, Japan Dates: 24 August-5 September Time in Tokyo: BST +8Coverage: Follow on Radio 5 Live and on the BBC Sport websiteBaroness Grey-Thompson, who won 11 Paralympic gold medals for Great Britain and competed at every summer Games from 1988 to 2004, will be part of the Radio 5 Live team in Japan and will be writing for BBC Sport during the Games.Arriving in Tokyo, I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect. It was a combination of relief that all the testing procedures for me were negative, and also relief that the Paralympic Games were going ahead. There was…

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SharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingimage sourceGetty ImagesChinese electric car maker BYD’s plan to sell shares in its computer chip making unit has been suspended, the latest share offering to be hit by Beijing’s crackdown on businesses.The listing has been put on hold due to a regulatory investigation into the law firm advising the company.The plan to list on Shenzen’s Nasdaq style market ChiNext was filed in May.The suspension comes amid a broader regulatory tightening on industry by Chinese authorities.Over the weekend, the Shenzen Stock Exchange said Beijing Tian Yuan Law Firm, one of China’s biggest legal services companies, was being investigated in relation to the listing.It said the firm, which has been an advisor for BYD Semiconductor’s planned initial public offering (IPO), was being investigated by China’s Security Regulatory Commission but gave no further details.BYD Semiconductor had aimed to raise at least $421m ($309m) from the sale of shares.It planned to invest the money back into the business as global carmakers struggle with a shortage of computer chipsThe firm is China’s biggest maker of microcontroller chips for vehicles.Microcontrollers are vital components in modern cars, used for everything from seats and windows to steering and anti-lock brakes.BYD Semiconductor competes directly with major chip makers including Germany’s Infineon and Rohm Semiconductor in Japan.Parent company BYD is China’s biggest car maker by market valuation and is backed by US investment veteran Warren Buffett. BYD is the latest Chinese company to have its plans up-ended as Beijing tightens regulations on everything from technology giants to insurance providers.New privacy lawBeijing is introducing measures to protect data privacy, and on Friday, China’s top legislative body, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, passed a sweeping new privacy law.The Personal Information Protection Law aims to strictly control data collection by technology firms and will take effect from 1 November.A number of technology companies have faced problems in China with relation to data privacy.Earlier this year, the country’s internet regulator ordered online stores not to offer Chinese ride-hailing firm Didi’s app, saying it illegally collected users’ personal data. It came just two days after the company’s New York Stock Exchange debut and its shares fell sharply on the news.In late July, shares in Chinese online tutoring firms slumped after Beijing stripped them of the ability to make a profit from teaching core subjects.Beijing has also cracked down on foreign investment in the industry.Last November, in one of the most high-profile business crackdowns by Beijing, the stock market debut of technology giant Ant Group was abruptly halted.Ant, backed by Jack Ma, the billionaire founder of e-commerce platform Alibaba, was set to sell shares worth about $34.4bn.But that was suspended on account of competition concerns, with China forcing a sweeping restructure on the group.The listings in Shanghai and Hong Kong would have been the biggest stock market debut to date.You may also be interested in:

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SharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingimage sourceGetty ImagesChinese electric car maker BYD’s plan to sell shares in its computer chip making unit has been suspended, the latest share offering to be hit by Beijing’s crackdown on businesses.The listing has been put on hold due to a regulatory investigation into the law firm advising the company.The plan to list on Shenzen’s Nasdaq style market ChiNext was filed in May.The suspension comes amid a broader regulatory tightening on industry by Chinese authorities.Over the weekend, the Shenzen Stock Exchange said Beijing Tian Yuan Law Firm, one of China’s biggest legal services companies, was being investigated in relation to the listing.It said the firm, which has been an advisor for BYD Semiconductor’s planned initial public offering (IPO), was being investigated by China’s Security Regulatory Commission but gave no further details.BYD Semiconductor had aimed to raise at least $421m ($309m) from the sale of shares.It planned to invest the money back into the business as global carmakers struggle with a shortage of computer chipsThe firm is China’s biggest maker of microcontroller chips for vehicles.Microcontrollers are vital components in modern cars, used for everything from seats and windows to steering and anti-lock brakes.BYD Semiconductor competes directly with major chip makers including Germany’s Infineon and Rohm Semiconductor in Japan.Parent company BYD is China’s biggest car maker by market valuation and is backed by US investment veteran Warren Buffett. BYD is the latest Chinese company to have its plans up-ended as Beijing tightens regulations on everything from technology giants to insurance providers.New privacy lawBeijing is introducing measures to protect data privacy, and on Friday, China’s top legislative body, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, passed a sweeping new privacy law.The Personal Information Protection Law aims to strictly control data collection by technology firms and will take effect from 1 November.A number of technology companies have faced problems in China with relation to data privacy.Earlier this year, the country’s internet regulator ordered online stores not to offer Chinese ride-hailing firm Didi’s app, saying it illegally collected users’ personal data. It came just two days after the company’s New York Stock Exchange debut and its shares fell sharply on the news.In late July, shares in Chinese online tutoring firms slumped after Beijing stripped them of the ability to make a profit from teaching core subjects.Beijing has also cracked down on foreign investment in the industry.Last November, in one of the most high-profile business crackdowns by Beijing, the stock market debut of technology giant Ant Group was abruptly halted.Ant, backed by Jack Ma, the billionaire founder of e-commerce platform Alibaba, was set to sell shares worth about $34.4bn.But that was suspended on account of competition concerns, with China forcing a sweeping restructure on the group.The listings in Shanghai and Hong Kong would have been the biggest stock market debut to date.You may also be interested in:

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It’s the first time bitcoin has reached that milestone since May 15. Bitcoin’s peers also advanced: Ethereum was up more than 3%, while dogecoin rose nearly 2%.Bitcoin had been inching near that mark all weekend before finally crossing it during Sunday evening hours Eastern Time, according to data from CoinDesk. The cryptocurrency is also getting a lift after PayPal (PYPL) announced that it will allow people to buy, hold and sell four types of cryptocurrencies — bitcoin, ethereum, litecoin and bitcoin cash — in the United Kingdom.This announcement marks the first international expansion of the company’s cryptocurrency offering outside of…

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SharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingimage sourceEPAA rail union has threatened strike action after a “potentially lethal” legionella outbreak was uncovered on Thameslink trains.The Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union is in dispute with the operator after trace amounts of legionella was found on toilets on four trains.Thameslink said the toilets have been drained and bleached.The RMT said the operator’s response was “half-hearted and inadequate” and called for an emergency meeting. Seven toilets on four trains had actionable traces of the bacteria, which can cause Legionnaires’ disease the union said.Left untreated Legionnaires’ disease can be fatal. Legionella is also linked to a…

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